Tag Archives: book reviews

0

Review Day Tuesday: The Museum of Intangible Things

by

Today’s review was a little hard to do, and has a little more to it than previous reviews.

The Museum of Intangible Things advertised itself as a young adult road trip novel, but what it REALLY is, is an exploration of mental illness and friendships being tested.

With that said, I hope you enjoy today’s video as I talk more about the book.

Thanks for watching!

You. Are. Awesome.

0

Review Day Tuesdays Return…Next Week

by

Review Day Tuesdays are my short YouTube videos where I review indie comics and novels. I had put the series on hiatus because, at the time, there was a LOT going on.

Now, I have more free time, since I’m freelancing full-time now, so Review Day Tuesdays are coming back next week.

The original plan was to bring it back on February 28th, but I’m not quite done with the script yet. The plan is to review the novel The Museum of Intangible Things by Wendy Wunder, and there’s a LOT to cover with that book. That’s why it’s talking a little longer than usual to get the script done, and then record and edit the video.

So for now, expect the Review Day Tuesdays series to start back up again on March 7th.

I can’t wait to share The Museum of Intangible Things with you. So stay tuned!

Thank you for your support.

You. Are. Awesome.

0

Review Day Tuesday: Heart of Darkmeat

by

Yes! Review Day Tuesdays are back, baby! The only change is there are now new reviews every other week.

You can get a copy of this book through Rubber Punk.

Thanks for watching!

You. Are. Awesome.

0

Bringing Review Day Tuesdays Back!

by

knights without armor book about masculinity
I will be reading this soon!

It’s been a while since I’ve done Review Day Tuesdays, my YouTube video series where I review new comics, books, and other works. I had put it on hiatus back in the tail end of June this year, because my schedule was getting too bananas to update it weekly.

Now I’m getting to a point where I can revive the series, but there will be one big change.

After I get done with a few more videos for the Poetry for Troubled Times series, I’ll be bringing back Review Day Tuesdays, to update every other week.

Why?

Not only have I been reading new comics lately, but I’ve also taken up the job of being head librarian at my local Universalist Unitarian Church. The library at the church has a lot of books dealing with LGBT issues, sociology, gender, and world religions, and that’s not even touching on the biography section or the multiple shelves of poetry.

One book in particular is one I want to discuss – the book pictured at the top of this post.

I’m looking forward to this one especially because of some reasons pointed out in this Hannah Wilton video about feminism and masculinity. The biggest reason is that while feminism has made great strides for women’s rights and roles, the roles of men haven’t been discussed much, and for feminism to be effective for everyone, that MUST be discussed.

Also! There’s one book I found in the library collection, called “Against the Tide.” It’s a book about men in the feminist movement. That book has a chapter talking about how the Equal Rights Act can benefit men as well as women, and I will actually read that chapter for YouTube at some point in the next few months, because it has portions in it that few people discuss even today.

I can’t wait to share these books with you, and the new comics I’ve come across, including Tank Girl’s newest run, “GOLD,” and “Once Our Land,” an 1830s post-apocalyptic comic that takes place in Germany.

Books, and the discussions of their ideas, are more important now than ever, and I hope you’ll join me when the series gets fully revived. I’ll announce a more specific date on my email newsletter.

Thank you for reading!

You. Are. Awesome.

0

Thoughts on “Transgender Warriors” and Leslie Friedman

by

I’m currently reading a fascinating book called Transgender Warriors by Leslie Friedman. It makes me think of The Yellow Lighted Bookshop by Lewis Buzbee in that both books are part memoir, part history books. The Yellow Lighted Bookshop is about the history of books as much as it’s the tale of the author growing into a mature librarian. Transgender Warriors is as much about Friedman as it is about trans people in history.

I recognized quite a few names of warriors in the first few chapters, as those people of history also appear in David E. Jones’s Women Warriors: A History. Women Warriors acknowledges that many of the women cross-dressed or exhibited more masculine qualities (like King Nzinga) but still has that gender binary. You have to infer that some women in that book were, in fact, non-binary. Maybe not “trans,” but definitely falling outside of man/woman dichotomies.

With that said, Friedman’s personal history is profoundly biased in one way: s/he was an active member, for many years, of the World Workers Party, a communist organization that was an offshoot of the Socialist Party in the USA. For all I know, s/he may still be a member.

So, there are many, many, many, MANY moments in the book that are cringe/noteworthy. To say s/he is NOT a fan of capitalism is an understatement on par with “I think North Korea may have a humanitarian problem.” Continue reading →

1 2 4